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Reflect on your woes March 22 2017

Lately we have been working 3M fabric into our pieces, utilizing the reflective quality of the material as a "graphic" on each jacket or shirt, rather than a structural component of the piece.

The "reflect"  denim jacket comes distressed with a classic slim fit and button-up front. 3M fabric is sewn onto medium-weight denim, giving the back of the jacket a cross-like design. The width and lines of the cross-like design follow the structure of the denim jacket. Embroidered artwork of an oriental flag sits at the cusp of the "cross".

The "reflect" flannel comes with a slightly elongated back and curved hems. With a classic fit and 100% cotton construction, this flannel shirt is made with comfort as top priority. The back of the shirt features a solid 3M reflective block for intentional contrast. Embroidered artwork of an oriental flag sits in the center of the reflective block.

One should reflect on his or her woes from time to time, keeping life's responsibilities in check. The projects and environments we put ourselves in are reflections of our wants and needs. 


Iron hooks and thread February 13 2017

4 skulls, bamboo leaves, the silver furred king, the sun


Fear February 10 2017

There is no fear in his eyes.


Shook ones February 09 2017

We think highly of ourselves, but are often shaken up by the harsh realities of life.

We are all shook ones.


The symbolism of cranes in Chinese art January 15 2017

The ancient Chinese have always been exceptionally creative in using various living, non-living and imaginary objects to represent abstract ideas. Modern generations have gone to great lengths to ensure the continuance of such cultural ideas, educating our posterity about symbols for everything, including life, death and longevity. Among the most widely used symbols are the ones for longevity. They include the bamboo, peach, gourd, pine, deer and our favourite, the crane.

Cranes play an important role in Chinese mythology. An embodiment of longevity and peace, the crane is venerated as the prince of all feathered creatures and thus has legendary status. Throughout the imperial times, crane motifs were used on the robes of civil officials to depict their ranks. Because of its ability to fly high and over long distances, its wings were used as an amulet for protection against exhaustion.

There are four types of cranes in Chinese mythology: White, black, blue and yellow. But rather than the color, the setting and postures of the swan are more important. A crane that is shown with its wings stretched out with one leg raised stands for longevity. When it is shown under a pine tree near a spotted deer, it symbolizes prolonged life. One that is shown among peony flowers stands for prosperity and longevity while one that is shown with lotus flowers symbolizes purity and longevity. If a crane is shown flying towards the sun, it signifies a desire for social advancement. A crane that is shown perched on a rock and looking at the sun stands for an important authority who can see everything. Two cranes walking or flying together is the ultimate symbol of longevity.

Since cranes fly in the clear blue sky above the dusty earth, they are also considered symbols of cleanliness and purity. When a Taoist priest is on his deathbed, people say that he is turning into a feathered crane. Many Chinese still believe that cranes carry their spirit to heaven after they die. With such a revered and legendary status, no wonder cranes appear consistently in Chinese art and embroidery.

The depiction of cranes in Chinese art is almost entirely based on their mythological significance and symbolism. But there is a slight difference between the way they are depicted in art and embroidery. While in art they are usually shown alone, in a pair or in a group in a beautiful natural setting, like a lake or waterfall, in embroidery they may be shown with other symbols such as a lion.

One of the more popular depictions of cranes in Chinese embroidery is of a red-crested crane flying among the clouds and roses, symbolizing longevity, wisdom and nobility. Another popular depiction is a crane hovering above a deer grazing under a pine tree. Two cranes dancing on the ground or flying together are also very common. Regardless of the scenes in which cranes are depicted, their symbolism in Chinese art is always important.


Closer look at the "osaka" embroidered sport coat December 30 2016

Twill / cotton blend, inner thermal lining, slim fitting button up blazer. Embroidered eagles on the back shoulder region. Regular drop for casual Fridays at the office or bumpin' nights in Orchard. This is Singapore, boy


Delving into the Embroidery Game December 16 2016

As of late, we have been delving into the art of embroidery, particularly into the construction of intricate patterns that are somewhat influenced by our Oriental roots. Somewhat addicting, the placement of embroidered artwork on raw denim and tailored suiting has gradually become an obsession. Whether this lasts will be purely determined by the popularity of pieces like these: